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Dining In

Recipe: Baked Salmon with Citrus Topping

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While farmed salmon is available all year long, fresh wild salmon has a season. Most sold in the U.S. comes from Alaskan or Pacific Northwest waters, starting in late spring to early fall. While there are still benefits to eating farmed salmon, wild contains less fat and calories, without any contaminants. This recipe serves eight, but can easily be cut in half. It’s great served with cooked jasmine rice mixed with chopped nuts and dried cherries or cranberries.

Ingredients

  • 4 salmon fillets (about 1 pound each)
  • 1 orange, peeled, white pith removed, sliced
  • 1 lemon, peeled, white pith removed, sliced
  • 1 lime, peeled, white pith removed, and sliced
  • ½ cup (1 stick) butter
  • 1 sweet white onion, sliced
  • ½ cup brown sugar
  • 2 cups orange juice
  • 2 tablespoons cornstarch
  • ¼ cup soy sauce
  • ¼ cup white vinegar

Recipe

  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Place salmon fillets, skin-side down, in a glass baking dish lightly coated with cooking spray or oil. Arrange orange, lemon, and lime slices on top of the salmon.
  2. In a large skillet over medium heat, melt butter. Add onions and saute until soft, about 5 minutes. Add brown sugar and cook 1 minute longer, stirring occasionally.
  3. Add orange juice, cornstarch, soy sauce, and vinegar. Stir constantly until thickened, about 2 minutes. Pour over the salmon and fruit. Bake, uncovered, until salmon is flaky, 15-18 minutes, or until salmon registers 145 degrees on an instant-read thermometer. To serve, remove skin from the salmon with a spatula and cut fish into serving pieces. Makes 8 servings.

Source: The Big Book of Potluck by Maryana Vollstedt

Barbara Walch
Barbara Walch joined the staff of Plano Profile in August 1986 and currently serves as Food Editor and Associate Publisher, Community Relations. In addition to writing Dining In, a monthly food feature, she is one of the Dining Divas. Barbara is a longtime member of the International Association of Culinary professionals (IACP). She is also a community volunteer, serving on the board of directors for City House, a nonprofit that shelters abused children and runaway homeless youth. And she is a member of the hospitality committee for the Plano Symphony Orchestra Guild.

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